You may have heard of the power of Kundalini awakenings and the difficult process of the dark night of the soul, but what separates these two experiences? Both involve the…

Dark Night Of The Soul Vs. Kundalini Awakening – What’s The Difference?

Dark Night Of The Soul Vs. Kundalini Awakening – What’s The Difference?

You may have heard of the power of Kundalini awakenings and the difficult process of the dark night of the soul, but what separates these two experiences?

Both involve the death of the ego for the soul purpose of becoming a channel to the divine – the dark night of the soul focuses on the difficulties and process of surrendering the ego while the Kundalini awakening focuses on the euphoria and bliss of being rid of the ego and letting the divine take over.

What’s interesting is not only the different focuses of the process, but where each term originates.

Kundalini awakening is an Eastern term used to describe the release of ones creative life energy, allowing you to become closer to the divine and become a freely flowing source of life energy (prana).

The main focus of Kundalini awakening is on the feelings of joy and bliss from the success of all your hard work – the main focus is the connection to the divine and plentiful energy felt upon the death of the ego.

In Kundalini awakenings, the death of the ego and the ego itself are not really focal points, they are simply small parts of the process. This is because Eastern countries have very little focus on individuality, and instead stress the importance of the collective.

This allows those brought up in cultures ,where one sees themselves as a collective over an individual, to stomp the ego out with less work than their Western counterparts.

This brings us to the dark night of the soul. This is a Western term which focuses on the process and difficulties of the death of the ego. Because Western countries stress individuality and build up the ego, the process of surrendering it becomes the biggest trial.

This is why the dark night of the soul focuses so much on the suffering and pain of getting rid of ones ego – because it is such a large part of our personalities and culture.

We consider our ego to be whom we are, making the release of it incredibly introspective to the point of feeling like we are suffering a loss of ourselves.

So what can those from cultures that stress the ego do?

We can begin to focus on ourselves as part of a collective instead of an individual. We can focus on ourselves as a small part of the Source, and consider the release of the ego not as a death, but as a transformation.

We can focus on the euphoria of doing so instead of the suffering needed to get there. Most of all, we need to remember that the ego is something our minds created, and it is something our minds can let go.

Love and light to you all!

By Missy Marston, Guest author


Helen Elizabeth Williams is the owner of DreamcatcherReality.com, where she is a staff writer. Her passions are: spirituality, meditation and polo. She adores all animals, but horses have a special place in her heart. She loves the diversity of our cultures, the beauty of simple people and the harmony of Mother Nature. ♥